Using the buttons, you can swivel the DXR-8's camera (so you can eyeball more of the room) and zoom in close. It actually comes with two interchangeable lenses – a standard and a zoom lens – and you can also buy a separate Infant Optics Wide Angle Lens (Est. $12), all of which can be used with the zoom button. This gives you lots of flexibility when deciding where to mount your camera, Baby Bargains points out. "Depending on the configuration of your nursery, your only option may be to put the camera on a dresser across from the crib -- then the normal lens might do. But if you mount the camera on a wall above the crib, the zoom lens might be better." Later, if you use the monitor in a toddler's room or playroom, the wide-angle lens might be the best choice.
The DM111 is a basic bare-bones sound option that does exactly what a sound product should do. It relays the sounds from your baby's room to the parent device with no muss no fuss and good sound quality. With a simple plug and play design, it is hard to mess up making it a great choice for parents who aren't technology savvy or for grandma who might find more complicated products frustrating. This product is the cheapest option in any of our reviews for monitoring products, but you won't be sacrificing sound quality or usefulness for the price.
The Philips Avent SCD630 earned a 4th place rank, but it is the number 1 ranked dedicated monitor we tested. It has the longest range and highest ease of use scores for the dedicated options and the best score for sound clarity out of all the monitors we tested in this review. The Philips has lullabies, a nightlight, 2-way talk to baby, automatic screen wakeup/sleep, sound activation, 2x zoom, and a temperature sensor. While it struggles to offer true to life images and has fewer features than most of the competition, it is hard to deny that this plug and play monitor is a simple solution for video baby monitoring, and it gets the job done with little fuss and only a small learning curve. However, if you want a remote-controlled camera, you should look elsewhere, as this one is manual with a smaller field of view.
Baby video monitors with all the latest bells and whistles cost around $200, sometimes more depending on the feature set. However, you can find solid baby monitors for $100 to $150 less than that, though you'll sacrifice on video resolution and some features. Cloud storage can add to the cost of a baby monitor in the form of an ongoing subscription, though that feature is usually optional.
The Infant Optics DXR-8 has a superior battery life to any of the other video monitors we tested, as well as a simpler monitor interface that’s more intuitive and easier to navigate than those found on competitors. The range, image quality, price, and many other features are comparable to the best competitors. Other good qualities include its basic but secure RF connection, and ability to pair multiple cameras, but those are features common to several other baby monitors. Every baby monitor has its share of negative feedback, but in more than 10,000 Amazon reviews, the complaints about the Infant Optics are relatively mild.
Correct me if I am wrong, but both Surface Pro and Surface 2 laptop have USB 3.0. But the new Surface headphones have USB-C for charging. If that is correct, why would MS make computing devices with incompatible USB ports? You wouldn't be able to charge the headphones on either device. Unless the headphones come with an adapter, it seems dumb to me.
Testing battery life for all the monitors was for the parent device only. While some of the dedicated options have a battery in the camera in the event of a power outage, most do not, and they are not intended for use as an all-night option. So while we would support a cordless camera for monitoring baby, due to safety concerns with babies and strangulation hazards, none of the products in our review offer this.
The Wi-Fi monitors all have lower EMF readings than the dedicated options with the lowest average EMF readings being 0.87 for the LeFun C2 720P Wi-Fi and 0.92 for the Nest Cam Indoor Wi-Fi with the reader 6 ft from the camera. The lowest average value for the dedicated monitors at 6 ft is 1.89 for the Infant Optics DXR-8 and 1.91 for the Philips Avent SCD630.

The Lila video quality isn't great, and while you can see what is happening in the room, it isn't true to life and could present confusing images. However, if you are looking for a monitoring option that provides images with good sound and you aren't worried about the finer image details, then the Lila is a good, easy to use product that is just what you've been looking for.
A good WiFi monitor is convenient and feature-rich — or else we may as well stick with the HelloBaby. The iBaby takes both aspect to the next level. It was the fastest WiFi model to set up at only five minutes. Once you download the app, a straightforward tutorial walks you through every feature. We liked that you can choose both sensitivity levels and notification options for noise, motion, temperature, and humidity — meaning the iBaby won’t alert you to those quiet falling-asleep sounds, or small movements unless you want it to.
We also liked the iBaby because while it allowed us to invite other users to see through the camera — great if you want to give your babysitter access while you’re out — only the person who registered the iBaby monitor has administrator access to all of the features. The administrator can give some privileges to other users, like being able to move the camera around, but they can take them away just as quickly.

The Philips Avent SCD630 is the easiest to use dedicated option with a score of 8 of 10. This monitor is a plug and play that pairs the camera and parent unit by itself. The parent unit has very few buttons, with the most frequently used buttons are on the face of the unit. The menu options are relatively intuitive with not much chance of taking a wrong turn or getting buried in a file menu system you can't get out of. The menu could be easier to use, but we think most parents will stick to the buttons on the front of the unit after a few weeks of regular use. The Levana Lila has fewer features and is even easier to use, thanks to a lack of convoluted menu options.
Wireless encryption: This ensures that no one else can tap into your monitor’s “feed” and see what’s going on in your house. WiFi-enabled monitors are great for portability and range, but may be more susceptible to hacking. If you go this route, be sure to secure your home wireless network and keep the monitor’s firmware updated. Otherwise look for digital monitors with a 2.4 GHz FHSS wireless transmission.
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